Our Projects

The objective of this organization is to empower and enable the Farmers, Small processors and Mama lishes to gain access to direct inputs, food supplies at competitive prices, markets, financial products and services while also through a robust capacity building program; They are equipped with the essential business development skills that are pertinent to their business growth.

Mama Lishe

Street food vending in Tanzania (like in most developing countries) is largely dominated by women, who account for 80-90% of all vendors and are locally called “Mama Lishe” or “Mama Ntilie” in Kiswahili. Most of them are between 20 and 45 years old, and about half are married with children (although a slight increase of singles can be recorded over the last ten years). With a large majority completed only primary school.

There are push and pull factors leading women to food vending business: push factors include divorce, death of spouse, dissatisfaction with salaried jobs, lack of available work; pull factors include need for independence, need for challenges, improved financial opportunity, self-fulfillment, desire to be own boss, flexibility for balancing family and work. Among all the employment options, street food vending is the most viable one for those low-educated, low-income women who experience limited access to the formal waged labor market. Such business, indeed, requires no formal education and low start-up investment, especially when carried out on an informal basis. in 2011 the investment to start up a street food business ranged between 10,000 and 19,000 TSh, which was largely sourced from own savings or from borrowings from relatives or friends. The majority of female vendors did house work before starting this business and only very few had received or participated in any training regarding the running of street food business. In many cases, these women become the main (or the only) breadwinners of their household, and although their revenues are usually small, they contribute significantly to the household capacity to cope with basic needs (e.g. clothing, school fees, health care). Moreover, food vending offers nutrition for the household on a (nearly) everyday basis even when the profit is low or absent.

Registered

0

Trained

0

Markets

0

Farmers

Agriculture is the main part of Tanzania’s economy. As of 2016, Tanzania had over 44 million hectares of arable land with only 33 percent of this amount in cultivation. Almost 70 percent of the poor population live in rural areas, and almost all of them are involved in the farming sector. Land is a vital asset in ensuring food security, and among the nine main food crops in Tanzania are maize, sorghum, millet, rice, wheat, beans, cassava, potatoes, and bananas. The agricultural industry makes a large contribution to the country’s foreign exchange earnings, with more than US$1 billion in earnings from cash crop exports.

At one point in its agricultural history, Tanzania was the largest producer of sisal in the world. The agriculture sector faces various challenges and had been the government’s top priority to develop to reduce poverty and increase productivity. Farming efficiently has been a challenge for many farmers, and lack of finances and farming education has caused many to remain subsistence farmers. Farm sizes remain very small with an average plot size being around 2.5 ha.

Challenges on the Agriculture Industry of Tanzania include lack of agricultural technology, droughts, floods, and agriculture temperature shocks. These pose severe challenges to the living standards of most of people involved in the Agriculture Industry in Tanzania and create huge increases in unemployment, hunger, malnutrition and starvation, and diseases rates.

Large declines in commodity prices, decreased export revenues, increased trade and budget deficits all amount to hindering the growth of the country’s gross domestic product (GDP). The Agriculture Industry in Tanzania represents 32.4 percent of GDP of Tanzania.

Registered

0

Trained

0

Markets

0

Small Processors

The small agro-processing sub-sector accounts for over 80% of all firms in Tanzania. However, the firms have not been effective in absorbing new labor in the market, as reflected by the unemployment rate, which increased from 5% in 2001to 10% in 2011. The low rate of labor absorption has been partly attributed to the slow growth of small agro-processing firms, which grew by only 10%. Labor productivity also is perceived to be low. Hence firms within the sub-sector have not performed to their expected potentials. The analysis show that about 63.6% of firms operated under capacity, hence employing below their potential due to low supply of raw materials, inadequate capital, and poor marketing systems as well as high cost of energy. Labor productivity growth was influenced by experience, education, training and physical capital. Also the growth of firms was influenced by the value of raw-materials, manager’s education and energy cost.

Registered

0

Trained

0

Markets

0